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Colour Film Comparison – Part 3

Equipment Reviews

Comparing Colour Films... again!

Responses51




We’re back with our film tests so sorry for those of you who are purely digital. The tests are really useful for the large number of people who are coming back to film or starting to use it for the first time. I only plan to do another two or three full comparisons such as this (an autumn scene, an overcast lush green scene and a winter scene for example) and then I’m also looking at a full test of all the colour films available (about 26 different films at this point in time – although only about 18 are in current production) which will give dynamic ranges and colour handling.

So, if you are still reading then you’ve got a passing interest in film (hurrah!) and I’ll see what I can do to help you choose which films you may wish to play with. The extra in this run was that we have included the new Portra 400 and Portra 160 films which have proven to give excellent results. Portra 400 has about 19 stops of dynamic range (about the same as Portra 400NC in the highlights but it has an extra couple of stops in the shadows) and Portra 160 is a very similar film to Portra 160VC but with a smoother grain and a small amount of extra dynamic range.

The scene I was testing was a view from the small poppy drifts on the ‘other’ side of Bamburgh castle in Northumberland. The sun had just popped below the castle and so the dynamic range was full on, probably 8 or 9 stops between the shaded greenery and the area around the castle and the deep shadows going down to about 13 stops below. The sun was moving as I was taking the shots but I’ve tried to group related films together. There shouldn’t be too much difference in colour – the latter neg shots will probably be a little cooler in the sky and at one point the sun ‘popped’ out for a few seconds in the right hand corner of the castle (coinciding with the early neg shots).

I don’t want to do too much analysis here – I’d like a fresh set of eyes to look at this and give comments so, please, if you have some conclusions about different films, please add comments to the bottom of this post and I’ll come back at the end of the week, compile the best and add my own conclusions.

Whole Photograph

The full picture with the photographs as they came out of the scanner (which means calibrated chromes and for neg film I set the shadow highlight points in my Howtek drum scanner software. However, similar results were had by making a raw scan and setting the RGB points in photoshop.)

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Whole Photograph (added contrast to neg and shadow/highlight to slides)

Because the negs come out with a very low contrast, I’ve applied a strong contrast curve, pulling the shadows and mid tones down and pushing the highlights up to creating a strong shoulder

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Whole Photograph (added grad to neg and shadow/highlight to slides)

In order to compare the slides and negs, many people will add a ‘virtual’ grad over the neg skies and so I’ve done some post processing on the negs that I would if I wanted to make them look more ‘chrome’ like

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Houses (default settings)

Here are the houses on the left hand side of the picture with the chromes boosted to show the shadow detail (not much needed doing the the negs) I’ve tried to balance the negs by setting a grey point on one of the posts

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Houses (Boost curve)

Applying a general boost to show the shadows (which has blown the highlights in the chromes)

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Houses (200% grain)

To give you an idea of the grain in the different film types, we’ve boosted the shadows on our 4000dpi scan and shown the results at 200%

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Sky (default)

Sky colour is something that changes quite a lot between different film types and so we’ve shown the raw sky results first

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Ektar grad
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Ektar grad
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Sky (curves on negs)

We’ve applied a virtual grad to the negs to show how they would look with a photoshop grad applied. You can see that we have an Ektar shot where we’ve applied an actual grad; The difference in colour is remarkable with Ektar where it changes colour depending on exposure level.

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Ektar grad
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Ektar grad
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Sky (curves on negs and noise reduction)

Neg film is particularly noisy in the highlights (especially when you make a scan using a 6 micron aperture like I have – if you use a drum scanner it is better to use a larger aperture. However I’ve found better results applying noise reduction to a finer scan. Here I’ve used Imagenomic’s Noiseware

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Ektar grad
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Ektar grad
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Castle (default)

We take a look at the castle with the chromes boosted a bit to bring up the shadows

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Castle (boost)

And an even bigger boost to show what is going on in the shadows

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Castle (colour match)

And finally I wanted to see what the castle would look like if we normlised the colour balance between the different films by taking a grey point off the white flowers in the foreground.

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Shadows (default boost scan)

We’re trying to see what is happening in the deep shadows at the bottom left of the picture

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Shadows (more boost)

Lifting the shadows even further to show where things fall into complete black (or complete blurgh in some films cases)

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400

Shadows (default boost scan)

And finally we fix the black points as there were some horrible colours in the deep shadows of some films (e.g. Velvia 100, Velvia 100F). This is probably the best comparison of ‘capability’

before
after
Comparing Velvia 50 with Velvia 100

Choose Which Films to Compare

Before side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400
After side
  • Velvia 50
  • Velvia 100
  • Velvia 100F
  • Provia
  • Astia
  • E100G
  • E100VS
  • Ektar
  • Pro160S
  • Portra 160NC
  • Portra 160VC
  • Portra 160
  • Portra 400NC
  • Portra 400


Tim Parkin

timparkin.co.uk

Flickr, Facebook, Twitter

51 thoughts on “Colour Film Comparison – Part 3

  1. Hi,

    Great job, very useful information, especially for beginners such as myself.

    And by the way I would like to ask you for a place (website), where do you recommend Film Proceesing and scanning?

    Kind Regards
    Martin

  2. Hi Marcin – glad you like. I would use Digitalab for processing (although I hear The Darkroom and Peak Imaging are good) and myself for drum scanning or alternatively Tristan Cambell. Or Ian Scovell for Imacon scans. Buy yourself either a Minolta Dimage or Nikon Coolscan scanner for medium format, 35mm or the Epson V700/750 for large format and use them for day to day scanning.

  3. Thank you Tim. I will try digitalab as you wrote. I know drum scanning gives fantastic quality but I can not afford it now, too pricy :) . And I’m going to buy Epson scanner, one of them: 3200, 3170, 4870, 4490, 4990 – good value for money.

    I play with my new purchase: Rolleiflex T. with Tessar 3,5 / 75. – my first medium format camera :) .

    Thank you again for your help and great articles, I read regularly.

  4. Hi Marcin, I’ve been using The Vault in Brighton for all of my slide film processing and, thus far, the results have been very good, but their prices don’t include VAT. I’ve just checked out Digitalab’s pricing though and they seem exceptionally good value – especially if processing in bulk, which I have been doing to keep postage costs reasonable.

    Tim: I don’t know if you know the answer to this, but I presume that the 20% discount applies to 5×4 sheets as well? I’ve been sending in my film in 10-15 sheet batches to The Vault and there’s no discount (despite me asking).

  5. I forgot to add that this has been an incredibly useful series of articles for me and it has given me enough information to make some fairly informed decisions about film choices – not only in terms of what I stock up on, but also in what might work best in a given scenario. That has been invaluable and, even though I do make additional exposures on other emulsions, the process of elimination is much easier.

  6. Fantastically useful Tim – thank you. Particularly interesting how much variance there is in how neg films see into the shadows, and how colour rendering changes outside the central exposure zones: Ektar seems particularly loony.

    • Reala is a fantastic film Filip. I used it in my Contax T2 35mm compact all the time. Also had great results from 120 in my Bronica SQA. Peak Imaging here in the UK produce(d) really good prints from this film using their standard processing. I dearly wished that Reala was made available in 5×4, there are however other superb options as Tim’s hard work has shown. Prior to using Reala, I used the early versions of Ektar from Kodak.

      • Thank you for info. I’m a child of digital photography and only recent I ventured in to film as well. My experience is limited to Fuji Velvia 100, some Fuji negative films, some Kodak negative films, in 35 and 120 format. And I used some Reala and I found it really pleasing, so I wanted to hear from more experienced people than me. I see now that I wasn’t wrong. :)

  7. Pingback: Colour Film Comparison | Fotography

  8. Hi Tim,

    Terrific job! Very useful to be able to mix and match the films on-screen. Really clearly shows the wide variation between the films.

    I’ve used both Digitalab and Peak Imaging – both are good – and Ian Scovell for the scanning (who fine-tuned his system to avoid getting vertical scan-lines on my Fuji Acros 100 films, which some other scanning firms were consistently getting).

    Cheers,
    Paul

  9. Tim I’d be fascinated to see a similar thing done but using a flatbed scanner (e.g. V700 / V750) rather than a drum scanner, since that is what a lot of us film users have practical everyday access to; I’m guessing it wouldn’t make very much difference with the neg films but might make quite a difference to how much of the shadows we could see into on some of the denser slide films?

    I know that, for example, my scanner just can’t see into some of the denser shadows of the Velvia 100 emulsions, even with multiple exposures, customised profiles and all that jazz.

  10. I wasn’t trying to create work! But an example photo from (for example) Velvia 50, being a popular emulsion, with drum vs. flatbed, and a similar thing with one of the neg films, would be pretty interesting. I think one reason for the relative gain in popularity of neg films might be down to the scanners that we consumers are using.

  11. Yes, an article on the V700/V750 and any tricks of the trade that you have learn’t over the years, would be very helpful, Tim. Am actually using your colour velvia profiles that you wrote about probably a couple of years ago on your website but I do think that my scanning could be improved…am all ears! I would think most use flatbeds than drum scanners….sadly.

  12. A combination of increased price for Velvia 50 and a good offer for Kodak Elite Chrome Extra Color 100 Film has temped me to buy some, so would be good to see this included in future tests to help get the best from it.

    • Portra 400 for speed
      Portra 160 for quality neg film
      Kodak E100G for neutral reproduction
      Astia for Portraits, Enhancing autumn colours and misty stuff
      Provia for Sunsets and other ‘peak light’
      Velvia 100F as a more neutral Velvia 50 (good for daytime shooting)
      Velvia 100 for a good low contrast boost
      Velvia 50 for 100% black magic, transformative powers

      That leaves Kodak Ektar which I can’t quite work out yet, Fuji Pro160S whose colours confuse me sometimes and E100VS which is like a Fuji 100F with a different flavour..

      • A strong summary Tim.
        Velvia 100F pushed a stop is very pleasing as it gains some warmth and offers a real speed benefit over RVP50 which can be useful in retaining detail or sharpness, structure in moving picture elements.

        Your research into producing a workflow for removing the vagaries of scanning colour neg are applauded. I found this quite a headache with each sheet seemingly having quite different settings.

      • I’ve tried to keep the scanning as ‘straight’ as possible so that I don’t ‘overwrite’ the natural colour of the film and so the inversions are generally done by cropping the inverted image to the main image area and then going into each channel and setting it so the bottom and top points are just clipping. There are better ways but I think this is probably the most informative.

        • Hi Tim, thanks for the quick response. I hope that in the near future you can spent some time on an article (or two) about scanning with the V750. Cheers!

  13. Hi All,

    Tim, thanks for this, a very useful addition to my knowledge base! For those who are interested, I have been using Kodak Elite Chrome Extra Color 100 for my 35mm for many years and find it very good, easy to scan and to adjust the scans in SilverFast. I have bene using Velvia 100F for medium format work but probably prefer Provia 100F – I find the Velvia quite difficult to handle and get the exposure and scans right. My initial trials with Ektar seem OK and I will be trying it more throughout this year. Rgds., Adam

  14. Really useful Tim, thanks. Having only just started to take my steps with 5×4, in fact just posting my first batch of this week, this will save me months if not years of experimentation. I have in mind a little project coming up towards the end of summer which looks to suit astia, so that’ll be my next purchase.

    Being a bit cheeky are you and Dav planning on having a selection of these available for the Workshop in the Lakes later this year?

    • Hi Joe – I can bring a few different ones if you like – anything you are particularly interested in? (Obviously I’ll bring the transparencies for you to look at too)

      • Thanks Tim, if you had some Portra 160 and maybe the Velvia 100F, that would be great. I’ll be using Provia through the summer, and then Astia as we start to get a bit of colour in the trees and some early mists, so by the time of the workshop should be reasonably comfortable with the results I’m getting from those.

  15. Hi Tim,
    Do you have experience with the fuji 400h film? It would be interesting comparing kodak portra with this film as it is designed to be a competitor of this film. My experience was more that 400h delivers slightly more grain but majestic greens good for landscapes. I dont really know if fujifilm captures more dynamic range as that of the latest portra seems to be very impressive with its 19 stops.

  16. Hi Tim,

    Very nice detailed articles for films comparison, actually i am not into color films much yet, but i will give that more experiment myself as well.

    For MF, my favorite color neg is Reala, Ektar can be second, but for neutral Portra is more preferable to me. in slide i will go with Velvia, Provia is second then E100VS third, but as long this Velvia is discontinued in 4×5 format, what we can use for landscapes in that large format then?

    I have V750, quite good for MF and decent for LF, but for 35 i scanned few as i don’t shoot that format in film at all i can’t judge, Nikon scanners are discontinued as well and i am not looking to buy a second hand Nikon scanner, only a drum scanner i will buy second hand, so where and which drum scanner you recommend to go with? give me 2-3 recommendations so i may not able to afford very expensive one even second hand.

    Thanks

    • It’s a tough question (both of them).

      1) For 4×5 film I would use Portra and Ektar on the neg side and Provia and possibly Vevia 100 (although I’m not completely sure about this film myself yet).

      2) Scanning – for 35mm you’re probably best getting a second hand Nikon or if new one of the Plustek Optikfilm which will be released sometime Q1 of this year. Drum scanners are few and far between. I’m looking for a second one and may end up shipping for the US.

      As for make of scanner, a Howtek 4000 or a Scanmate would do you well and are quite cheap second hand.

      • Hi again,

        Well, i have Ektar, but our only lab in the country told us that they don’t process color neg in smaller amount, means i must send minimum 10-20 sheets to process them at once, i don’t shoot 4×5 much yet at all to justify that many sheets, so i was planning for only transparency, i did shoot i think Velvia 100F 2 sheet on my 4×5 and didn’t like the results, but i liked the result of this film on my MF, i have Velvia50 100 sheets that will be enough for me for a while say maybe 2-3 years, but if i wasted some of those sheets on tests or not so decent results then where i can get more Velvia50 after 2-3 years.

        About the scanner, i also thinking about Howtek, but i was more thinking about 8000 model over 4000 one, i am not sure about that 4000 model but i want a drum scanner that can scan up to 8×10, not only up to 4×5 even i don’t have 8×10, but i know myself that i buy a lot and can imagine i go this format sooner or later, so i should be ready to have a scanner for that format size. Again, where i can buy those drum scanners whether Howtek or Aztek or Scanmate?

  17. Very informative film comparison – it’s rare to see such an untertaking in analog dimension these days. Thanks a million!

    To make sure the following is no knocking-talk, rather than another analog-nutter’s observation :) ->

    What I’m very surprised of are the Velvia 100 results compared to 50 shadow-wise. I’ve always found 10 doing better in the shadows than the 50 yet here it’s noticably inferior. I never liked 100F since the colours just didn’t seem to be so “Velvia” as I expected when it came out, 100 was a step to the right direction again colour wise. And also in this comparison 100F looks better than 100 almost in everything – colour and shadow. It’s completely opposite of my experiences. :) Agree that the 50 is pure magic in colour and tonality and it’s the best colour slide film ever made IMHO, but I never seen it shine in the shadows in comparisons with other slide films.

    I wonder if the Velvia 100 here had “seen” too little First Developer (in E6 process) from the lab? It seems the details just don’t “punch” out as I’d expect them in comparison with 50. FD basically develops b&w image, the luminant details for the image (shadows to highlights) and the colours are developed later with the Colour Developer that is also sensitive but not as much as the FD. I’ve started to develop my own E6s and I’ve experienced this inconsistancy in the First Developer results from process-to-process, small development time (just few seconds difference of FD can be already noticable in E6 overall details) or chemical exhaustion variation can make big differences in the final image.

    I guess the best side-by-side E6 results comparson would be if all the slides are developed in the same tank and within the same process (you can stick 12+ films into some tanks) to remove all the “analog-process” variations (although this “uncertanty” is one of the reasons why we love to shoot film!). To bring the best out of the films it is also fitting to use the proper 6-bath processing chemicals that E6 slide films were designed for, not the strpped 3-bath development kits that many labs use these days to save on developing costs and to make more profit. Always ask the lab with what they develop their E6s with.

    Maybe a food for though for the next comparisons… C41 is whole different story of course, but the principle should be the same.

    Keep up the good work and many thanks again for the rare insight into the fine details of the magical analog world!

    PS: deffo get a proper drum scanner, if you ask me there’s nothing (maybe just minus Kodak/Creo high-end CCD scanners) that compares to the scans made through high-end PMT equipment by an experienced operator.

    Margus

  18. Hi Margus – thanks for the long comment, sorry this won’t be as I’m out and about at the minute and on an iPhone. Re: velvia: the film was dev’d together in the same pro dip and dunk machine. I think the difference with the results is due to the drum scanning (I run a drum scanning business and spent some time on them). 50 has quite a bit in the shadows compared with the 100s. Especially so for straight 100 which goes a bit muddy in the shadows quite fast. Interestingly in some tests I’ve done v50 has more dynamic range than provia but it’s all in the deep shadows.

    I might reinvent the neg at some point as it isn’t that great and I’ve learned a lot in the last year or so…

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