on landscape The online magazine for landscape photographers
Issue 80 PDF
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Digital Negative / Digital Print
Are these the books the great Ansel would have written?
End Frame – Near Stonehenge by Charlie Waite
David Ward chooses one of his favourite images
Weston’s Point Lobos
Kimberly Schneider walks in the Footprints of Giants
Charlie Waite Exhibition
Lyttleton Balcony, National Theatre
Vanda Ralevska
Featured Photographer
Respect
Walk Softly and Leave no Trace?
Landscape Photography and Evolutionary Psychology
Looking at our Hard Wired Response to Landscape
Tripod Wars: Time for a Ceasefire?
A View from the Other Side
Shadow Colour
Watch What you Dodge...
Viewpoint Editor’s Letter editor@onlandscape.co.uk
Tim Parkin

Summer in the UK is typically a fallow season for landscape photographers. Yes you can still get good photography done but with dawn twilight starting about half an hour before sunset it all gets a little confusing! The countryside is just a little too 'green' or 'GREEN!!' for most picturesque purposes and without some moderating light or weather conditions it can all get a bit monotonous.

Around where we live there are many wildflower meadows and me and a colleague have been out a few times trying to capture some sense of the beauty of a sea of minuscule flowers (cue far too much tilt, collapsing tripods and cursing at the wind). Things are all about to change though - the lilacs of the heather are starting to appear and it won't be long until the National Parks are glowing with the pink of unfit photographers faces (and heather!).

On Landscape's migration to an 'as it happens' content publication model has seen a big increase in the number of comments so thanks for the level of engagement, and also a jump in subscribers. We're just ironing out the last few bugs in our workflow and looking forward to getting on the road for the start of the late summer/autumn photography period (peak season in the UK!).

This issue sees a range of content but if we can recommend one thing we suggest you try to see Charlie Waite's exhibition at the National Theatre. Whatever the controversy surrounding the Take a View competition, Charlie is a rightful master of landscape photography and this is his biggest exhibition to date and very good it is too - check out our review in this issue and also David Ward's commentary on one of Charlie's classic images.

 

Tim Parkin

Content Issue Eighty
Comments1

Issue 80 PDF

You can download the PDF by following the link below. The PDF can be viewed using Adobe Acrobat or by using an application such as Goodreader for the iPad. Click here to download issue 80 more

Comments11

Digital Negative / Digital Print

Since starting On Landscape I've mostly been reviewing either portfolio style books or new releases. I'd like to take a little departure from this to review a book I've had for a while now and which keeps catching the corner of my eye as it sits permanently on my desk. To begin with though, I'd like to introduce the author as it's his pedigree and knowledge that make this such an excellent resource. Jeff Schewe Jeff Schewe graduated from Rochester Institute of more

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End Frame – Near Stonehenge by Charlie Waite

Many of the previous incumbents of this post have remarked upon the impossibility of the task presented to us by our esteemed editor. It might not quite be comparable with the Labours of Hercules but it’s still pretty daunting. When Tim asked me to suggest my End Frame I briefly toyed with saying “No!”... but quickly dismissed this as an option. A few moments thought during the phone call had already provided a long list of possible candidates: Evening’s more

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Weston’s Point Lobos

Hi Kimberly, can you tell us a little bit about your background, how you got into photography and why landscape in particular? It seems like I was always taking photos, but it wasn't until 1999, when I transferred to Colorado State University, as a philosophy major, that I happened to fall into photography. Basically, I happened to be in the art building, leaving my required survey art class, when I noticed a sign for a job working as a photo more

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Charlie Waite Exhibition

For one of the most well known landscape photographers in the UK, Charlie Waite has been awfully quiet about his own work for the last decade. We’ve seen him promoting both his own tour company, Light and Land, and the hugely successful Landscape Photographer of the Year (or Take a View as it’s more formally known) but we only see the occasional new image associated with other events or in his self published book “Arc and Line”. So it more

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Vanda Ralevska

Vanda Ralevska is as unstinting in her enthusiasm and encouragement for her fellow photographers as she is in her own passion for creating images. Despite being a talented wedding and portrait photographer, she has chosen to concentrate on landscape photography. If there is a hill or mountain in the UK that she hasn’t climbed or an area of coast yet to be walked, you can rest assured that they are probably on her list. At times it is easy to more

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Respect

Prior to venturing out onto a sandy shore or through pristine snow with a group of photographers I often give them a little advice about tripod rage. This is a serious problem that can result in bruised egos or (in the worst cases) physical bruises, abrasions or even concussion. A minor downside of being on location with seven or eight fellow photographers is that they can sometimes crop up in your field of view. This isn’t usually too serious more

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Landscape Photography and Evolutionary Psychology

When we view any landscape scene, there is some form of emotional response. This article is about the fundamental origins of these reactions – why elements of a captivating landscape photograph such as compositional features, environmental conditions and lighting situations trigger human emotion. Evolutionary psychology attempts to explain why our interpretations and reactions are, to a large extent, universal among modern humans.1 Why, for instance, does an expansive view with a clear focal point, areas of high contrast and more

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Tripod Wars: Time for a Ceasefire?

Imagine the scene – I’m sitting at home in my front room next to my wife, who is watching Grey’s Anatomy (I apologise on her behalf). Having recently subscribed to On Landscape I am busy making my way through the substantial number of previous issues and reading with interest so much of the excellent articles that have been submitted. Being fairly new to landscape photography I am hugely enjoying reading the ideas and thoughts of those much more experienced more

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Shadow Colour

Over the last year or so I’ve been looking more and more into the properties of light and how it interacts with surfaces, shadows, etc. Some of my first research, prompted by a workshop with our own David Ward when I was first getting into photography, was around how shadows are ‘coloured’. This came about when discussing David’s ‘Poverty Flats’ - a stunning example of how sunny day, blue sky shadows can be intensely blue cast (especially when mixed more

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