on landscape The online magazine for landscape photographers

Peter Eastway

Featured Photographer

Peter Eastway

Peter Eastway is an AIPP Grand Master of Photography and a two-time winner of the Australian Professional Photographer of the Year Award. He has worked collaboratively or as an ambassador with Adobe (Lightroom), Canon, Canson, EIZO, Epson, Kodak, LaCie, Lumix, Nik, SanDisk, Sony, Wacom, Phase One and Capture One. He is a past chairman of the Australian Professional Photography Awards and has exhibited, judged and lectured on photography internationally. Importantly, he still rides a short board and two skis are better than one.

petereastway.com



Michéla Griffith

My images combine an early love of drawing and painting with a long-standing passion for photographing the landscape. An important part of my portfolio continues to be about the interaction between water and light in, but I’m also experimenting with movement on land and even my own progress on foot through the landscape. Facebook Flickr

michelagriffith.com



Sometimes it’s good to swap sides of the desk and for this issue, we are interviewing Peter Eastway, who among many other things is Editor and Publisher of Better Photography Magazine. When I got in touch with Peter he initially wondered if it was payback for sending Tim some work, but I had quite coincidentally been enjoying Peter’s images. Of the many on his website, we’ve largely narrowed our image selection down to the Polar Regions, a particular passion of Peter’s, and of course his homeland, Australia. While the diversity of locations he has visited might prompt you to think that travel is the key to a successful image you’ll find out that, for Peter, image capture is only the beginning of the story and his ethos can be applied wherever you chose to photograph.

Peter Eastway - AntarcticThunderstorm

Thunderstorm opposite Neko Harbour, Antarctica

Would you like to start by telling readers a little about yourself – where you grew up, your education and early interests, and what that led you to do?

I’m told I was conceived in England and born in Melbourne, but I’ve lived all my knowing life in Sydney, Australia. Most of the time I’ve worked as a professional photographer, including editing and publishing photography magazines, plus a number of other business interests.

When did you first pick up a camera? What prompted this and what kind of images did you want to make?

In school, my first camera was a Ricoh compact in a circular water housing. As a keen surfer, I wanted to photograph my friends from the water. I was infatuated with surfing and couldn’t really understand why people would want to take photos of anything other than surfing! Later in life, I changed this view.

Who (photographers, artists or individuals) or what has most inspired you, or driven you forward in your own development as a photographer?

As a photo magazine editor for over 40 years, it’s hard to pinpoint one or two photographers who have inspired me because there are so many. What’s the difference between plagiarism and inspiration? Plagiarists copy one photographer, but when you’re inspired, you’re copying the work of thousands. Editing a photography magazine has given me an appreciation of every genre of photography (except maybe passport portraits) and I have met and interviewed many of my heroes as well.

However, since we have a polar bent to this article,

Plagiarists copy one photographer, but when you’re inspired, you’re copying the work of thousands. Editing a photography magazine has given me an appreciation of every genre of photography (except maybe passport portraits) and I have met and interviewed many of my heroes as well.
I’ll suggest Australian photographer Frank Hurley who travelled with Shackleton to Antarctica in the early 1900s, photographing and filming an epic journey across the Weddell Sea and up to Elephant Island. Hurley was a showman, which I think is still necessary if you’re going to be a successful professional photographer. Hurley would return from his trips with a slide show and give presentations in town halls around Australia, enthralling his audiences. Today most of us do something similar on Instagram, but what I love about Hurley is the way he would interpret his photos, pushing the technology available to him as far as possible. Although working over 100 years ago with plate glass negatives, he would drop in skies and ‘adjust’ the reality of the image in the darkroom to better tell his story. What he did would not be allowed by documentary or nature photographers today, yet back then, no one really knew what happened inside the darkroom – although he certainly had his critics.



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