on landscape The online magazine for landscape photographers
Issue 147 PDF
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End frame: “Below South Crofty” by Jem Southam
Mike Chisholm chooses one of his favourite images
Subscribers 4×4 Portfolios
Arjun Nambiar, Barry Rosof, David Cary & Mattia Oliviero
Eyes Make the Horizon
An immaterial conception of place
Finding the forest when lost amongst the trees
Finding an emotional connection
In Search of Colour
Building a Standard Preset
Trophy Hunting in Utah
Mentally empty or harmless fun?
The Decaying Alps
Humanity’s Presence
Perfection or Excellence?
Chasing the Impossible
Steve Gosling and the desire to touch…
Thomas Peck’s Critiques
Viewpoint Editor’s Letter editor@onlandscape.co.uk
Tim Parkin

For the last week I have been leading a workshop teaching people large format photography based here in Glencoe. Although most of the teaching has been about techniques and workflows, we did spend some time discussing what it was about large format that attracts people and keeps them using such cumbersome cameras, even though digital cameras now give almost the same quality final images. After a day photographing in Glen Nevis, we came to the conclusion that one of the big advantages of large format is that very little of your time is actually spent looking at the camera. A typical ‘good’ day with a large format camera may mean just a handful of exposures and hence a great deal of time is ‘invested’ in looking and for each exposure there is the time spent looking at the land and waiting for conditions to be just right. This isn’t unique to large format though. The photographers Orsolya and Erlend Haaberg were asked how many they recharged batteries on their 40 day camping trips in the on the edge of the arctic. They surprised the audience by saying that they only take 5 camera batteries and no way of charging - they just turn on the camera when they have found a photograph and turn it off when they have finished. [ I wrote about a related topic in an article “Opportunity Cost” a few years ago]

Click here to download issue 147 (high quality, 135Mb)

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Tim Parkin

Content Issue One Hundred and Forty Seven
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Issue 147 PDF

Click here to download issue 147 (high quality, 135Mb) Click here to download issue 147 (smaller download, 70Mb) more

Comments1

End frame: “Below South Crofty” by Jem Southam

For some this picture is a mysterious invocation of the spirit of place, and yet for others is little more than an undisciplined snapshot, barely worth consideration as a “landscape photograph” at all. Continue reading → more

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Subscribers 4×4 Portfolios

Our 4×4 feature is a set of 4 landscape photography portfolios from our subscribers: Arjun Nambiar, Barry Rosof, David Cary & Mattia Oliviero Continue reading → more

Comments2

Eyes Make the Horizon

I moved to Marquette, Michigan, on the south shore of Lake Superior. I did this with the intention of creating a body of photographs as a response to my sustained presence in the Northern Great Lakes. Continue reading → more

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Finding the forest when lost amongst the trees

In photography though that word implies the ability for artistic vision. The ability to isolate and focus on those visual elements that will be key to self expression. Continue reading → more

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In Search of Colour

From the moment I started using digital cameras with my Canon 20D I had difficulty in getting ‘pleasing’ colour. I was regularly told that digital cameras were accurate and yet what I saw on the LCD and computer was rarely   Continue reading → more

Comments3

Trophy Hunting in Utah

Don’t knock trophy hunting, it’s OK once in a while, and they are trophy shots for a reason. Continue reading → more

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The Decaying Alps

The reality I saw was quite different, and yet perhaps no different to any other mountain landscape. Switzerland is a developed country, not a wilderness. Humanity’s presence is everywhere – even if landscape photography rarely embraces that presence to its full extent. Continue reading → more

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Perfection or Excellence?

Why should I spent so much of my time chasing something that is not possible for me to achieve? Is it not better to chase something that can be achieved and measured? Continue reading → more

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Steve Gosling and the desire to touch…

Two images then, one which calls for the viewer to reach out and stroke its softness whilst the other forbids any such interference. Continue reading → more

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