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Issue 176 PDF
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End frame: Destruction of the Monumental Arch 2018 Sir Don MuCullin
Terry Ward chooses one of his favourite images
Subscribers 4×4 Portfolios
Bret Edge, Fenella Ross-Elmer, Ian Bramham & Monica Almada Gouveia
Paul Hill
Meeting of Minds Conference 2018
Photographing for Others
If I was the last person on the planet, would I still photograph?
The Photo Book
A key medium to convey inspiration
Wall
Around The Gameshope Glen
Thierry Bornier
Featured Photographer
Viewpoint Editor’s Letter editor@onlandscape.co.uk
Tim Parkin

We’ve had a pretty fine winter week in the Highlands of Scotland, but during that time I’ve encountered what must be a recurring theme for the landscape photographer. That is the regret of not spending more time out when the conditions are excellent. As soon as the bad weather returned this week I was cursing myself for not getting out more than I did. It was made even worse looking at the pictures posted by other people (some made just 15 minutes from our house).

I suppose many people would mock me for having the opportunity on my doorstep (living in the Highlands) and not making the most of it. But when you’re looking out of the window in the dark and it doesn’t look that great, and there’s that hurdle to overcome just to get up and out of the house and de-ice the car etc. it’s very easy to say “it won’t be that good”.

I often get the same feeling when I’m on a photography trip, and the conditions aren’t quite right or when we’ve had the great ‘morning light’ and now we’re onto the ‘average midday light’. The urge to return to the comfort of ‘home’ and have a kip or to find a cafe somewhere for a snack is strong. And yet even the average midday light in Torridon or Iceland is still loads better than the boring rainy winter day back home. Why do I do this?

I need to remind myself that photography isn’t a competition (no matter how much social media makes it seem that way) and the main thing is enjoying yourself, it’s not about putting in the hours, and enjoyment is more than just producing photos. It’s also worth reminding yourself that anything you have to force yourself to do is the very definition of work. So put in a bit of extra effort to get out and stay out when conditions are excellent by all means - But don’t beat yourself up too much when things get back to normal and you think you didn’t make the most of things. There’s always next time for that!

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Tim Parkin

Content Issue One Hundred and Seventy Six
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Issue 176 PDF

Click here to download issue 176 (high quality, 95Mb) Click here to download issue 176 (smaller download, 56Mb) more

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End frame: Destruction of the Monumental Arch 2018 Sir Don MuCullin

The scene of destruction could be why Don was drawn to this area, it looks like it has just been bombed, the image documents a crushed and repressed area. more

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Subscribers 4×4 Portfolios

This issue our 4x4 landscape photography portfolio feature is from subscribers: Bret Edge, Fenella Ross-Elmer, Ian Bramham & Monica Almada Gouveia. more

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Paul Hill

Paul offers a provocative alternative vision of landscape photography that advocates that we could make more interesting landscape images by being ourselves. more

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Photographing for Others

If I woke up tomorrow to find a world in which I was the only human being (coincidentally, one of my favourite recurring dreams), I would still photograph? more

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The Photo Book

There are different reasons why books provide enlightenment and meaning which is absent from other supports. more

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Wall

The wall skirts around Gameshope Glen in a horseshoe ending not far from where it started, close to Talla Reservoir, a couple of miles east of the Tweed Valley. more

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Thierry Bornier

Perhaps the thing that strikes me most about Thierry’s poetic images of China is that it is very much a manmade and managed landscape, and also a peopled landscape. more

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