on landscape The online magazine for landscape photographers
Issue 113 PDF
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Dan Rubin – “From Instant Film to iPhone”
Talks at The Photography Show 2016
Endframe: Platon, North Kivu, Eastern Congo by Richard Mosse
Nicholas White talks about one of his favourite images
Scene from the Water’s Edge
Landscape Photography Exhibition
Compositional Controversies
Part 3: Aspect Ratio Wars
Subscribers 4×4 Portfolios
Larry Monczka, Nick Petrides, William Dore & Robert Hewitt
An Accidental Book Venture
From curiosity to business venture
Luminous photographs
one of my favourite photographic secrets
Franci van der Vyver
Featured Photographer
Rolling Stones, Norwegian Wood and some others
a homage to Eliot Porter
Viewpoint Editor’s Letter editor@onlandscape.co.uk
Tim Parkin

When we organised the talk hub for Linhof Studio at the Photography Show I knew all of the speakers apart from one. That single unknown was a photographer called Dan Rubin and he’s fairly well known to those who frequent the social media photography website known as Instagram as having one of the first and most popular accounts. All I knew about Dan was his press photo and that was enough for me to be put off immediately.

So it was with some surprise that he was actually a normal human being and even more surprisingly, someone I had actually known for over 12 years (a few years of crossing paths at web conferences). He also gave a very interesting talk about his approach to photography. One of the biggest things I took away from speaking to Dan was that his use of so many cameras wasn’t just an affectation - each camera had a personality, a way of being used that affected the way Dan saw the world and hence the end result. This is something I’ve seen from my own work - different types of camera make you see differently. In Dan’s case, this camera agnostic view of photography has ended up with him getting big commissions where he’ll mix taking pictures with film and digital, large format and holga, SLR and twin lens reflex.

If this is true, has the homogenisation of camera design over the last decade limited expression and is this another reason why people are drawn to cameras like the Fuji system? It does suggest that the more camera styles on the market, the better it is for photography! While you’re thinking about that, you can read more about Dan Rubin here and enjoy his talk on You Tube in this issue.

Click here to download issue 113 (high quality, 90Mb)

Click here to download issue 113 (smaller download, 38Mb)

Tim Parkin

Content Issue One Hundred and Thirteen
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Issue 113 PDF

Click here to download issue 113 (high quality, 90Mb) Click here to download issue 113 (smaller download, 38Mb) more

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Dan Rubin – “From Instant Film to iPhone”

Dan Rubin joined us at the Photography Show on the Linhof Studio stand in March 2016. He gave an inspiring talk on his working practice and his discovery and use of Instagram. more

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Endframe: Platon, North Kivu, Eastern Congo by Richard Mosse

I’ve selected the image, ‘Platon, North Kivu, Eastern Congo’ from his series ‘Infra’. Broadly speaking, ‘Infra’ offers what is referred to as a “radical rethinking” to the portrayal of the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. more

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Scene from the Water’s Edge

Scene from the Water’s Edge’ is a collection of images taken over approximately six years. The images including the stunning local landscape in and around the East Midlands and also locations from around the UK coastline and France. more

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Compositional Controversies

Debate has often raged between photographers, about the advantages and characteristics of specific aspect ratios. I know that, having listened (and contributed) to a few such debates over the years. And yet, how significant is aspect ratio, and is it meaningful to us as we develop our photography? more

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Subscribers 4×4 Portfolios

Our 4x4 feature is a set of four mini portfolios from our subscribers Larry Monczka, Nick Petrides, William Dore & Robert Hewitt. more

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An Accidental Book Venture

In 2013 I self-published a photography location guide book, which started out as personal curiosity and accidentally ended up as a continuing venture. How I hadn’t thought of combining photography and book publishing before then is a mystery to me in hindsight, but let me explain how it happened. more

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Luminous photographs

Technically, luminosity refers to how much light an object emits. In photography we tend to think of luminosity as how much light an object reflects, we measure luminosity with light meters, usually the amount reflected off the subject, though this isn’t really technically correct. A printmaker will think of luminosity in terms of how much of the paper tone will shine through in the final print. An artist will think of how bright the lightest tones they will add more

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Franci van der Vyver

To me the appeal of photography lies in the communication – to understand how and why we see things in different ways and then to translate it into a different way of viewing the subject that is then made visible to all. more

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Rolling Stones, Norwegian Wood and some others

In 1990 I visited the Ansel Adams Gallery in Yosemite National Park. I was eager to see some powerful American landscape photographs. In their collection of work by the American masters, they had several dye transfer prints by Eliot Porter and for very decent amount of money. However at this time in my life I was not ready for Eliot Porter. I simply did not appreciate the subtle content of his intimate landscapes. more

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