on landscape The online magazine for landscape photographers
Issue 153 PDF
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Masters of Landscape Photography – Book Review
Ross Hoddinott
Photographing Scotland – Book Review
Dougie Cunningham / Fotovue
Capture Lakeland – Book Review
James Bell
On self-reliance, solitude and landscape photography
Reflections of my own experiences
End Frame: The Strangles by David Ward
Prashant Khapane chooses one of his favourite images
Subscribers 4×4 Portfolios
Ana Tofan, David Moorhouse, Giannis Gogos & Glyn Lewis
Meeting of Minds Conference Exhibition
Speakers & Delegates Exhibition at Conference in November
Neil Barr
Featured Photographer
It Depends
Divergent Thinking, Creativity, and Why You Should Care
My Journey into Large Format Photography
Not as hard as you'd think
Bottom Moor
Jason talks about his photographic project on his commute to work
On Exhibitions
Reflections on Artistic Inspiration
Viewpoint Editor’s Letter editor@onlandscape.co.uk
Tim Parkin

The age old argument of photo manipulation has reared its head again recently (not that it really goes away) but this time a blogger called Matt Payne followed up an interview with Alex Nail with an article discussing the reasons and justifications behind the ever more egregious creations of graphic arts posing as natural history photography. One of the most interesting aspects of Matt's article comes from his understanding on the psychological components of behaviour. He quotes a study saying "People who win competitions feel more entitled, and that feeling of entitlement is what predicts dishonesty". In other words the more success a person has, the more they feel they can bend the rules to get more success because they obviously deserve it. This, combined with another couple of observed behaviours, struck me as a great predictor of the arms race that is photo manipulation. I saw a recent comment from one of the winners of the International Photographer of the Year saying that they created their photographic 'composites' in order to inspire people with the beauty of the natural landscape'. This was posted next to an image of a hill that had been turned into a massive mountain (whilst forgetting to render the reflection in the water below). I had to read that a few times. I'm hoping to get the original author of the article to write something for On Landscape and possibly open it for discussion. I have no personal conclusions apart from a repeat of one of our guidelines for the Wildlife Photographer of the Year - if a photograph significantly deceives the typical viewer then it has crossed a line which could disengage that viewer once they know the truth. Whether this is a problem is up to the artist but knowing where your own line is and how it relates to your audience is, for me, the important thing. Have a look at Matt's article here and tell us what you think and if you have any questions you'd like us to put to him.

Conference

And this month we're announcing the first set of speakers (Colin Prior, Sandra Bartocha, Theo Bosboom and Charlie Waite) for our On Landscape conference and we're taking early bird bookings as of today. So please go and visit the conference web page to keep up to date on tickets, speakers and exhibitors. We'll also be running the conference exhibition again this year so every visitor gets to have one of their prints professionally printed by Fotospeed and displayed in the Rheged main hall.

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Tim Parkin

Content Issue One Hundred and Fifty Three
Comments0

Issue 153 PDF

The age old argument of photo manipulation has reared its head again recently and this time a blogger called Matt Payne. more

Comments16

Masters of Landscape Photography – Book Review

One of the core concepts of the book is that each photographer therein represents a master of some arena of landscape photography. more

Comments4

Photographing Scotland – Book Review

The book is actually pretty comprehensive when you’re looking at the classic icons of photography but it will never offer the sort of in-depth coverage that you might get in guides to other areas. more

Comments0

Capture Lakeland – Book Review

Most of the classic locations in the Lakes are represented, and if James likes an area, you’ll get more photographs of it. more

Comments0

On self-reliance, solitude and landscape photography

I instantly paused the interview and started thinking of some adventures of my own in order to embrace landscape photography thoroughly, like he did in that journey. more

Comments15

End Frame: The Strangles by David Ward

When I received an email from On Landscape to write for the "End Frame" I was thrilled at first and then panicked. Panicked for two reasons/; Which photograph or artist to write about? There are so many I appreciate and adore. From Galen Rowel to Guy Tal. From Bruce Percy to Michael Kenna. From Ansel Adams to Jack Dykinga. Can I write anything at all, words worthy of the image? Firstly, I used Google to find images made by my more

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Subscribers 4×4 Portfolios

Our 4x4 feature is a set of 4 landscape photography portfolios from our subscribers: Ana Tofan, David Moorhouse, Giannis Gogos & Glyn Lewis. more

Comments5

Meeting of Minds Conference Exhibition

Delighted to announce the launch of the On Landscape Conference Exhibition in collaboration with Fotospeed. more

Comments6

Neil Barr

For Neil, landscape photography started as an addendum to an escape into the landscapes of Scotland, but it soon became much more than that leading him to step through the door. more

Comments8

It Depends

The short answer is that creative expression (accomplished by way of divergent thinking) is shown to be strongly correlated with a sense of meaning in life. more

Comments4

My Journey into Large Format Photography

Large Format will not make a bad picture good but what it will do is make a good picture even better, even if just by the sense of achievement gained when it all comes together. more

Comments3

Bottom Moor

For most people, the drive to work in the cold dark mornings during autumn and winter provides an indifferent start to their day. For me, as I pull off the driveway I'm full of hope and optimism. more

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On Exhibitions

Scientific research has proved that our brains react and process information in different ways, activating different parts of the brain, depending on whether we are exposed to physical or digital media (like an image on our iPhone). more

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